Harry Potter, Warner Brother Studio Tour, London

I took a trip to the Harry Potter, Warner Brother Studio Tour in London a couple weeks ago. I was not only inspired by the great amount of sets and artifacts from the films but also amazed by the work and skill put into making the films and everything we see in the duration of them.

I was mostly inspired by the sketches and plans for the Hogwarts school and the scene boards for the characters in the film. I was so taken back because I got an insight on just how much work is put into films like this and how every detail is taken into account to meet very high standards. The style and presentation of these artworks were shown as sketches and carefully measured drawings done with pencils and ink pen, which I liked the look of.

I enjoyed viewing the illustration-take on the scene boards the most because they were simple yet detailed at the same time.

There are also some photos of the graphics work created for the props in the films. They are so creative and just like everything else, so detailed. I loved just looking at all the small artifacts and plans for the Harry Potter series and has definitely inspired my future work in illustration and graphics.

I have also inserted photographs of the building plans too. These are made from white card and incredibly detailed within the structure and form of the architecture. Looking at this, you can appreciate the detail and precision one needs to have an end result like these.

 

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Art Deco Patterns

I decided to play around with Art Deco patterns more and see how they can be incorporated into an illustration piece.

The first two patterns are from secondary sources, printed from the internet but the last is painted by myself. They all are created using watercolours; the thin black lines are made using highly pigmented watercolour and a size 0 brush to get small, smooth, controlled lines.

I like these pieces a lot and would like to work more in this style as I think it’s similar to my own map idea (earlier post) so is quite original and it’s also fun to work with.

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Printed pattern, done with watercolours

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Printed pattern, done with watercolours

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Self-created pattern, done with watercolours

 

V&A and The National Gallery

Recently I visited the Victoria and Albert Museum and The National Gallery in London.

I did this to inspire my recent work for my Art Deco project. I was looking at not only the artwork on display but also the architecture and structures of the buildings around me.

I found this trip inspiring but was down that the Saatchi Gallery was taken over by a single exhibition at the time I visited; I would like to re-visit this gallery in the future. I found a few artists and artworks which have developed in my project, mostly focusing on patterns of the 1920s Art Deco movement.

 

 

Developed Art Deco Illustration

This was a development I made to my last art deco style with illustration. I focused more on the face due to inspiration from the artist: Katie Rodgers.

I still ran with the idea of making it Art Deco using patterns instead of the fashion during the 1920s. I really like how these turned out and want to work more in this style and with these different medias like watercolour and ink and also fabric.

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Primary image inspiration, using watercolour and ink

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Done on Fabric with watercolour and felt pen

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Secondary image from fashion magazines, using watercolour

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Secondary image from fashion magazines, using watercolour

“Art cannot be criticized because every mistake is a new creation”

During a London visit in 2012, an exhibition was held displaying the works of Mr. Brainwash. His work is greatly inspired by Banksy. The exhibition ‘exit through the gift shop’ displayed wonderful, imaginative creations with the words from Mr. Brianwash, admitting he is “Banksy’s biggest work of art”.

I loved the look of these pieces and as they seemed free-spirited and so fun to look at. There was everything from portraits created from broken records to paint splattered to all corners of the room. I found the exhibition very different to anything I’d seen before as nothing was in frames and if they were, they were graffitied or broken; I enjoyed myself and the whole atmosphere of the warehouse-looking space became exciting as soon as you went inside.

These pieces are sold for £26k for an original piece, or more but if you can’t spare that type of money, you can pick up a free souvenir poster on the way out. Just as I did!